Listed below are the wineries we import. However, we also distribute wines from other out of state importers that are not listed here. They include wines from Mise, Zev Rovine Selections, Critical Mass Selections, Langdon Shiverick, and Selections de la Vina. Please contact us directly for a complete list of available wines.

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I NOSTRI PRODUTTORI

Cento Filari

Simone Roveglia’s Centro Filari is an estate in Mombaruzzo, Piedmont, 30km east of Alba, situated in hills slightly higher and more rugged than those of the Langhe. This area along the confines of Liguria is a hotbed for idiosyncratic organic winemaking and winemakers. Hiding out in these same woods are the Valli Unite winemaking commune, Andrea Scovero, Walter Massa, and Stefano Bellotti’s Cascina degli Ulivi to name a few. They feed off of each other, and can be said form an unofficial patchwork of “biodistretti”. Simone in particular gets a little help from the government who’ve deemed his land part of the “Bosco della Sorti” ecological preserve. Grapes represent just one facet of this estate. Harvesting fruits and veggies, foraging berries, flowers, and mushrooms, and just leaving untampered-with forest be create a biodiversity that keeps itself in check.

The vineyards lie 260 meters above sea level on clay-based soil mixed with sand, gravel, and limestone. The average age of the vines is 18 years. The vineyard is practicing biodynamic. All of Simone’s wines are unfined, unfiltered, use indigenous yeast, and have either no or extremely low sulfites added. There is a 6ft high half-pipe on premises.

Freisa, Pinot Nero, and Barbera d’Asti available May 2015.

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I NOSTRI PRODUTTORI

LE CANTINE DI CASTIGNANO

As the kids of Italy continue to drink more beer and cocktails over wine the cooperatives south of Alto Adige have been forced to either find new markets for their bulk wine in emerging places to the East or take a cue from their Tirolean countrymen and up their game once and for all. The Cantine di Castignano is a one of those marquee co-ops south of the Alps rethinking the formula. Castignano is in southern Le Marche a few km north of Abruzzo and west of the Adriatic, right in the heart of the Offida DOCG zone, and just steps from the tallest mountains in the Apennine. It has the least amount of farmers of any other co-op in the area. Those they do have therefore bring their grapes to Castignano representing an incredibly varied swathe of concentrated terrain. This allows the enologists to get playful with their lines of wine. We’re importing the Montemisio Pecorino whose grapes are sourced from micro estates scattered along the mountain ridges from 350 to 600 meters above the sea. This is a banner benchmark Pecorino that heralds a new way of thinking what the modern co-op is capable of.

Montemisio Pecorino available May 2015 in 750ml and 20L Keykegs to follow.

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‘Bianco della Moglie’ Passerina del Frusinate, Az. Agr. Rapillo, Lazio 2015

‘Rosso del Marito’ Cesanese, Az. Agr. Rapillo, Lazio 2015

Azienda Agricola Rapillo is a biodynamic farm located in Serrone in the heart of the Ciociaria 350 meters above sea level between the Valle del Latini and the Arcinazzo plateaus. This is a scraggy inhospitable volcanic terrain — in fact its name means can ‘serrated’ — not conveniently located near an Autostrada nor near anyone’s beaten path really. So hard to reach that, though it’s only 50 miles from Rome, the indigenous people called the Ernici remained independent  from Rome until 300 AD. Therefore, it should come as no surprise that when we found Rapillo they weren’t even bottling their delicious wines, they were selling them only in growlers to the lucky locals that passed by. This is their first bottling. Our friend made the labels for them.

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‘Io’ Rosso Piceno, Az. Agr. Dianetti, Le Marche 2013

45% Montepulciano, 45% Sangiovese, 10% Syrah.  Clay, sand, alluvial soil. Fermented in stainless steel. The best Rosso Piceno we’ve ever tasted. Keeping this description direct and to the point because that’s pretty much how the wine is made. There is one wine maker, Emanuele Dianetti, and there is one farmer, his mother. They have about 2 acres of land, no plans of expanding, life is good, could care less that their wine is exported to America. That simple.